Why Does God Hate the Poor? Prologue / Part II

Why does God hate the poor? It is not my intent to complain about this problem. Such would be a waste and equivalent to complaining about it becoming dark at night. I accept as an indisputable and unchanging fact of life that cannot be altered by human action that humanity always will be as George Orwell described it; I quote him from his book 1984:

Throughout recorded time and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age, there have been three kinds of people in the world. The high, the middle, and the low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they’ve born countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude toward one another, have varied from age to age. But the essential structure of society is never altered. Even after enormous upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always reasserted itself. Just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium however far it’s pushed one way or the other. The aims of these three groups are entirely irreconcilable. The aim of the high is to remain where they are. The aim of the middle is to change places with the high. The aim of the low, where they to have any aim, for it is an abiding characteristic of the low that they are too much crushed by drudgery, to be more than intermittently conscious of anything outside their daily lives, is to abolish all distinctions and create a society in which all men shall be equal. Thus throughout history’s struggle, which is the same in its main outlines, reoccurs over and over again. For long periods, the high seem to be securely in power, but sooner or later there always comes a moment when they lose either their belief in themselves, or their capacity to govern efficiently, or both. They are then overthrown by the middle, who enlist the low on their side by pretending to them that they are fighting for liberty and justice. As soon as they have reached their objective, the middle thrusts the low back into their old position of servitude, and themselves become the high. Presently a new middle group splits off from one of the other groups, or from both of them, and the struggle begins over again. Of the three groups, only the low are never even temporarily successful in achieving their aims.

 

Would it be an exaggeration to say that throughout history, there has been no progress of any material kind? Even today, in a period of decline, the average human being is physically better off than he was a few centuries ago, but no advance in wealth, no softening of manners, no reform or revolution has ever brought humanity, human equality, any millimeter nearer. From the point of view of the low, no historical change has ever meant much more than a change in the name of their masters.

 

The only problem with this great description of reality by George Orwell is its limitation to recorded time. Even assuming there is such a thing as unrecorded time as distinct from recorded time, separation of humans into the lows and highs seems not to be limited to any social construct but seems to be an undisputed absolute truth of human nature. In all possible worlds in which there are human beings, this social construct will exist and thus it is not solely a social construct. All humans living and treating each other as equals and loving each other may be a vision of Heaven but would be a short, boring, mind-numbing, lazy, life on earth. Without struggle and battle for something, human life would be shallow, boring, cowardly, and short — unless you were self-centered enough to become an amoral god ignoring reality to live in the timeliness and thus the power of the moment throughout a shallow, cowardly, and passionless life.

 
Phrasing the problem as a matter of evil existing in the world misstates the nature of the problem. One of my philosophy professors phrased it as follows: evil exists in the world; if God exists, there are only two reasons for evil’s existence: either He wants it to exist, or He cannot stop it from existing; either way, He is not God. This phrasing of the problem is a fallacy, because the concepts of good and evil are human creations. God by definition is the reason there is something instead of nothing. The something can be whatever God wants it to be. If this something involves pain and suffering for His creations, so be it, it is His creation. He can do whatever He wants with it. It makes no sense to say that before creation there existed a requirement that God’s creation must be friendly and kind to any beings He creates. He created creation, it is what it is. As I discussed in an earlier essay, ethics is simply a set of rules created by those in power to stay in power. It makes no sense to demand that God be ethical. He is the ultimate power and source of all power. He makes whatever rules He wants. It makes no sense to talk as if He has a choice between good or evil or wills good or evil. The concept of choice and will necessarily involve an incomplete being that needs something. God is omnipresent, infinite, and complete by definition. He does not need anything, and thus there are no choices that He has to make nor for Him to want or will anything. He and His nature all exist by necessity. As the philosopher Spinosa described, we may just be moments in the infinite necessary existence of God contemplating Himself and thus we have the perception of time, choice, and will; but, it is simply human perception that sees choices and will. God’s existence and all aspects of His nature exist by necessity.

 

The problem as I have phrased it is a more accurate description because the issue is a bigger problem of morality. Given that God is the reason we exist, does He owe individual creations anything for giving us existence we never requested? Do we owe Him something for making us exist? Given all of the evil that has existed in the world, including evil inflicted on innocents such as infants and beasts of burden, even if God were to offer us eternal happiness in Heaven simply by accepting Him as He is, would it not be our moral burden to reject it? Why does God prefer certain people over others? You can call it divine predestination, class conflict, or whatever. The reality of human nature, for other than a completely solitary hermit existence, is that God prefers to have about 1% to at most 10% of humanity at any given time live much better than the remainder of humanity and to have the power of oppression over the remainder of humanity. For this small percentage of humanity, at any given time, life has meaning of their own creation. For the remainder of humanity at any given time, their meaning of life is purely to serve the meaning created by these few Powers-that-be. In the absence of such service, life is nothing but meaningless anguish. At best they are gifted with their life being short. Dostoevsky wrote a couple of great novels asking these questions, The Brothers Karamazov and The Possessed, but never answered these questions. These are questions that must be answered as part of trying to answer the overall question of why does God hate the poor.

 
Let us try to build on prior essays to approach this question, try to answer it, and try to see if there is an answer as philosophers not as polemics by self serving gods. The first issue that we must approach in trying to answer this question is whether the concept of morality even applies to God. Is God moral?

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