Why Does God Hate the Poor: Can God Hate?

Now that I have ontologically defined love and hate and have considered the option of living without either, what about God? Does He love, hate, or exist in a passionless existence without either?

 

God by ontological definition is the reason there is something instead of nothing. So the element of existing and continuing to exist must be present. If He were to hate Himself, there would have to be another reason why there is something instead of nothing and that would be God. So we are back to the ontological proof of God’s existence. As discussed earlier, as an omnipresent, omniscient, complete being, She exists by necessity and thus is Her own meaning. Therefore, She does satisfy the three elements of love but only nominally in the same way that She has a will as we discussed earlier. He has to love Himself in the same way He has to will His existence. He nominally wills and loves. Just as God wills by necessity as a source of something instead of nothing not in a human sense of willing or wanting something we lack, God ontologically must love Herself because She must. God cannot hate Herself as humans can and do. This means that She cannot be passionless. Even if God does not hate, there will always be self-love in God. The more interesting question is can He hate others. He cannot hate Himself, but what about the something that He has created?

If we are all just thoughts in the mind of God, as some idealist and the pantheistic philosopher Spinosa and many Ancient and Eastern philosophies say we are then we should all share and know of the self-love that God has. In which case, I would not be asking the question that I am asking. However, I am asking it, and it is clear that God loving Himself is not a love present in all living things, at least not in humans. God’s self-love seems to be present in animals and in non-human life because they do not commit suicide nor suffer consciousness and perception of a meaningless existence. So in nature, the natural world and non-human life seem to be a reflection of God’s love and always have God’s self-love whereas humans on the other hand not only can lack it and contemplate suicide but actually lose it and commit suicide.

 
As I stated earlier, we can contemplate self-love rationally because our individual existence is the only knowledge we have. I know I exist simply by existing; what else exists rationally requires evidence or proof. When we go beyond existential attributes of our existence, we start contemplating matters “whereof one cannot speak thereof one must be silent” however we cannot because these are important matters. I will try to do the best I can without becoming fiction or pure aesthetics by not abandoning the three classical rules of logic: identity, non-contradiction, and the excluded middle. To say that we cannot speak of something is a contradiction because we are speaking about it. Thus logic to a limited extent is able to speak about that which it cannot speak but only to a very limited extent as we have been contemplating. However, if this ontological language violates these basic rules of logic, then just as for other logical statements, the language cannot be knowledge ontologically or otherwise and we are getting into aesthetics.

 
Since God must love Himself, if we are really just thoughts in the mind of God, this love should be evident in all of us. It clearly is not. The reality is and it is factually undisputed that God hates certain people, in particular the poor, and that this hate even extends to animals and other creations while He loves others. In reality, it is factually undisputed that He prefers certain lives to exist, to continue existing, and to have meaning and thus loves them while others He hates. So as much as I admire Spinosa, we have to reject his pantheistic view of reality.

 
It seems in my initial card game analogy is more accurate than it appeared to be at first. Somehow God, the reason there is something instead of nothing, set up the cards, card table, antes, and players; got the game started; and now is sitting back outside the game watching to see how it all ends though He knows how it all ends. God does love nominally. Furthermore, since reality establishes that He does hate, God does hate but not Himself. Somehow God was able to create something and then remain outside of the something created. How can He do this? On this question, we have truly reached an issue whereof one cannot speak thereof one must be silent.

 

However, the answer of how He does hate does not matter to a question of why He hates the poor. He can and does.

 
The concept of the Trinity just as polytheism — breaking up the reason there is something instead of nothing into many reasons — might have been created by Christian theologians and the rational mind of the religious as a way to get around this essentially amoral nature of God. God knows He is amoral as He knows everything. In order to reach an understanding with His human creations, God becomes human so on and so forth and this requires a Holy Spirit to mediate between the two. Does this Trinity and polytheism generally help us in any way on this issue of God’s hate of the poor? Not really, hate for the poor is still hate for the poor, but I want to discuss this option as a side issue for a moment before I continue with my questioning and contemplation.

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